Vacunas en inmigrantes y refugiados: un reto para los sistemas de salud europeos

Added March 22, 2018

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Fifty-eight articles were included in a qualitative synthesis to assess the frequency of vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccination coverage among migrants and refugees in Europe. The results showed that immigrants and refugees have lower immunization rates compared to populations born in Europe.

Studies have shown that the countries of origin of migrants and refugees have decreased immunization rates. A qualitative systematic review was conducted to assess the frequency of vaccine-preventable diseases, as well as vaccine coverage, among migrants and refugees in Europe. Fifty-eight articles were obtained from Medline and Cochrane databases. The diseases analyzed include the following: hepatitis B, measles, rubella, mumps, tetanus, polio, whooping cough, diphtheria, meningitis, and chicken pox. While there was insufficient data for several of the diseases analyzed, several studies concluded that migrants and refugees have lower immunization rates. Reasons for these lower immunization rates include low vaccination coverage in the country of origin, constant migration that prevents multiple doses from being applied, lack of patient registration, and lack of coordination by public health authorities. The authors recommend further monitoring of the vaccination status when entering Europe.

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