Factors associated with the willingness of healthcare workers to work during an influenza public health emergency

Added March 26, 2020

Citation: Devnani M. Factors associated with the willingness of health care personnel to work during an influenza public health emergency: an integrative review. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine 2012; 27(6): 551-66

What is this? An effective public health response to an emergency such as that caused by COVID-19 depends on the majority of uninfected healthcare workers continuing to work.

In this integrative review, the author searched for quantitative research into the willingness of healthcare workers to work during an influenza public health emergency. They restricted their search to articles published in English in a peer-reviewed journal and did the search in 2012. They identified 32 eligible studies.

What works: Factors associated with a greater willingness to work during an influenza public health emergency included being male, being a doctor or nurse, working in a clinical or emergency department, working full-time, prior influenza education and training, prior experience working during an influenza emergency, the perception of value in response, the belief in duty, the availability of personal protective equipment and confidence in one’s employer.

Interventions that resulted in the greatest increase in the healthcare workers’ willingness to work were access to treatment and vaccination for them and their family.

What doesn’t work: Factors found to be associated with less willingness to work during an influenza public health emergency included being in a supportive staff position, working part-time, the peak phase of the influenza emergency, concern for family and loved ones and personal obligations.

What’s uncertain: There is uncertainy about the association between age or race and willingness of healthcare workers to work during an influenza public health emergency.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the coronavirus (COVID-19) but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the coronavirus (COVID-19) on the basis of this summary alone.

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