Delivery of nutrition interventions to women and children in conflict settings in low- and middle-income countries

Added July 13, 2021

Citation: Shah S, Padhani ZA, Als D, et al. Delivering nutrition interventions to women and children in conflict settings: a systematic review. BMJ Global Health. 2021;6(4):e004897.

What is this: In conflict settings in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), women and children suffer from a high burden of malnutrition and poor nutritional outcomes.

In this systematic review, the authors searched for studies of the delivery, coverage and effects of nutrition programmes for women and children living in conflict areas in LMICs. They restricted their searches to articles published in English between 1 January 1990 and 31 March 2018. They included 91 studies, which were mostly from sub-Saharan Africa (43 studies), or the Middle East and Northern Africa (31).

What was found:

Facilitators for the delivery of nutrition programmes for women and children living in conflict areas in LMICs included community advocacy and social mobilisation, effective monitoring and the integration of nutrition, and other sectoral interventions and services.

Barriers to the delivery of nutrition programmes for women and children living in conflict areas in LMICs included insufficient resources, nutritional commodity shortages, security concerns, poor reporting, limited cooperation and difficulty accessing and following-up of beneficiaries.

Further studies are needed of the effects of nutritional interventions and to evaluate preventive and curative nutritional programmes in camps and outside of camp settings.

 

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