Yield of active screening for tuberculosis among asylum seekers in Germany: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Added December 4, 2017

Citation: Bozorgmehr K., Razum O., Saure D., et al. Yield of active screening for tuberculosis among asylum seekers in Germany: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eurosurveillance. 2017;23(22):12

Six articles were included in a meta-analysis to estimate the yield of active screening for tuberculosis among asylum seekers in Germany. The meta-analysis resulted in a pooled yield of 3.47 cases of active tuberculosis per 1,000 screened.

All asylum seekers are screened for tuberculosis upon entry to Germany, yet there is limited evidence regarding the yield of these screening tests. Six articles reported the yield of active tuberculosis based on limited data, ranging from 0.72 to 6.41 cases of active tuberculosis per 1,000 asylum seekers. The pooled estimated of the six studies was 3.47 cases of active tuberculosis per 1,000 screened in Germany. This number was similar to international estimates of active tuberculosis, which was 3.04 cases per 1,000 screened internationally. However, it is important to note that further research is needed to not only develop more targeted screening programs, but determine the number of active TB cases nationally in Germany and in Western Europe. Limitations of this study include the heterogeneity of study characteristics and study results, as well as variations in case definitions and diagnostic methods of tuberculosis.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the health of refugees and asylum seekers but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the health of refugees and asylum seekers on the basis of this summary alone.

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