The effect of balanced protein energy supplementation in undernourished pregnant women and child physical growth in low- and middle-income countries

Added March 9, 2018

Citation: Stevens B., Buettner P., Watt K., et al. The effect of balanced protein energy supplementation in undernourished pregnant women and child physical growth in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Maternal and Child Nutrition, 2015;11(4):415-32

No significant benefit of protein energy supplementation (PES) was observed on birth length or birth head circumference. Impact of intervention could not be determined for longer-term physical growth due to limited evidence. Additional research is required in low- and middle-income countries to identify impacts on longer-term infant growth.

The effects of PES in women on child growth are still considered to be unclear. Studies have been conducted to assess the effects of PES on undernourished pregnant women in low- and middle-income countries on physical growth. This review searched several databases and found seven studies deemed suitable for inclusion using the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. No significant effect of PES was found for length, nor head circumference at birth. Insufficient evidence was obtained to determine the effects of PES on long term physical growth, additional research in this area is required.

 

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