School and community-based interventions for refugee and asylum seeking children

Added August 3, 2017

Citation: Tyrer R.A., Fazel M. School and community-based interventions for refugee and asylum seeking children: A systematic review. Published February 24, 2014. Plos One 9(2), e89359.

The findings suggest that school-based interventions could be helpful for children to overcome mental health struggles associated with forced migration. However, due to the significant heterogeneity between the included studies, a meta-analysis could not be conducted.

As many newcomer children face mental health concerns upon resettlement, school and community-based staff often aim to identify at-risk children and provide necessary services. The authors aim to systematically review mental health interventions that have been evaluated in both school and community-based settings for refugee and asylum seeking children. Twenty-one studies were included in the review, totaling data from 1,800 child participants. Most the studies were conducted in a school setting (n=11), in comparison to community-based (n=3) or refugee camp settings (n=7). Studied primary outcomes include impacts on depression, anxiety, PTSD, functional impairment, and traumatic grief. The findings suggest that school-based interventions could be helpful for children with mental health concerns associated with forced migrations. However, due to the significant heterogeneity between the studied interventions and target populations, a meta-analysis could not be conducted. The authors caution that the conclusions of this review cannot be generalized to all interventions.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the health of refugees and asylum seekers but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the health of refugees and asylum seekers on the basis of this summary alone.

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