Ready to use therapeutic food (RUTF) for home‐based nutritional rehabilitation of severe acute malnutrition in children from six months to five years of age

Added October 10, 2019

Citation: Schoonees A., Lombard M.J., Musekiwa A., et al. Ready‐to‐use therapeutic food (RUTF) for home‐based nutritional rehabilitation of severe acute malnutrition in children from six months to five years of age. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2019, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD009000

Standard RUTF meeting total daily nutritional requirements may improve recovery and relapse compared to a similar RUTF given as a supplement to the usual diet, but the effects on mortality and rate of weight gain are not clear. When comparing RUTFs with different formulations, the current evidence does not favour a particular formulation, except for relapse, which is reduced with standard RUTF.

Treating severe acute malnourished children in hospitals is not always desirable or practical in rural settings, and home treatment may be better. Home treatment can be food prepared by the carer, such as flour porridge, or commercially manufactured food, such as ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF). This review aims to assess the effects of home-based RUTF on recovery, relapse, and mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition.

 

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