Neuropsychological long-term sequelae of Ebola virus disease survivors

Added December 4, 2018

Citation: Lötsch F, Schnyder J, Goorhuis A, Grobusch MP. Neuropsychological long-term sequelae of Ebola virus disease survivors–a systematic review. Travel medicine and infectious disease. 2017 Jul 1;18:18-23.

Summary: Survivors of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) commonly suffered from depression, insomnia, fatigue, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. Data from high quality studies is scarce, which prevents drawing conclusions about the impact and magnitude of these conditions.

This systematic review aimed to assess the neuro- and socio-psychological long-term conditions experiences by Ebola virus diseases survivors. A total of 10 papers were included. Evidence was found for the experience of depression, insomnia, fatigue, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. However, many methodological issues prevent clear conclusions, such as lack of control groups. Of note is that depression was in none of the studies formally diagnosed by a psychiatrist. A prospective, controlled cohort study protocol in preparation for potential future outbreaks is advised.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on Ebola but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about Ebola on the basis of this summary alone.

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