Neonatal zinc supplementation for prevention of mortality and morbidity in breastfed low birth weight infants

Added September 28, 2020

Citation: Gulani A., Bhatnagar S., & Sachdev H.P. Neonatal zinc supplementation for prevention of mortality and morbidity in breastfed low birth weight infants: Systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Indian Pediatrics 2011;48(2):111-7

Free to view: No

In view of no convincing evidence of benefits from the limited data available currently, there is no justification for recommending routine zinc supplementation for breastfed low birth weight newborns in these populations. Future research and trials on this subject should examine: outcomes in more settings in Asia and Africa; and should be adequately powered to estimate mortality.

Existing observational data has suggested that higher levels of zinc in the diet may be needed to meet the needs of low-birth-weight (LBW), breast-fed infants. This review aims to evaluate whether zinc supplements prevent mortality and morbidity in breastfed LBW infants. Three trials were included in this review following risk of bias assessments, with one trial deemed not adequately powered for drawing certain conclusions. Limited data did not show a reduced risk of mortality, hospitalization rate, acute respiratory infection, or diarrhea with zinc supplementation. No evidence of an increase in height or weight with zinc supplementation was observed. There was also no evidence to suggest an increase in rates of vomiting with supplementation. Serum zinc levels at the end of intervention were significantly higher in the supplemented group. There is insufficient evidence to provide justification for recommending routine zinc supplementation for breastfed LBW newborns in developing countries.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence the prevention and treatment of malnutrition but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about prevention or treatment of malnutirition on the basis of this summary alone.

Share