Estimating infectious disease in UK asylum seekers and refugees: a systematic review of prevalence studies

Added March 9, 2016

Citation: Clark R.C., Mytton J. Estimating infectious disease in UK asylum seekers and refugees: a systematic review of prevalence studies. Journal of Public Health 2007;29(4):420-8.

Five studies were identified for variable prevalence rates for TB, hepatitis B and HIV in asylum seekers in the UK. It was unclear if the reported rates were true risk variation or reflected methodological differences.

The prevalence of TB ranged from 1.33 to 10.42 per 1000 (three studies). The prevalence of Hepatitis B ranged from 57 to 118 per 1000 (three studies). The prevalence rate for HIV of 38.19 per 1000 (one study). It was not possible to estimate a single prevalence figure for each disease due to the heterogeneity of the included studies. Studies varied considerably in their sampling frame, study design, sample size, measurement of outcomes and follow-up. High quality studies are required to improve the validity of prevalence findings and generalizability to comparable asylum seeker and refugee populations.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the health of refugees and asylum seekers but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the health of refugees and asylum seekers on the basis of this summary alone.

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