Community monitoring interventions to curb corruption and increase access and quality of service delivery in low‐and middle‐income countries

Added April 28, 2020

Citation: Molina E, Carella L, Pacheco A, et al. Community monitoring interventions to curb corruption and increase access and quality of service delivery in low‐and middle‐income countries: a systematic review. Campbell Systematic Reviews 2016; 12(1): 1-204

What is this: During a crisis like COVID-19, when countries resort to special measures to help prevent the spread of the virus and manage the pandemic, misinformation or the inappropriate use of emergency funds could divert valuable resources from people who need these most.

In this Campbell systematic review, the authors searched for research assessing the effects of community monitoring interventions on corruption and access, and quality of service delivery. They did not restrict by language of publication and did their search in November 2013. They included 15 studies, which were from Asia (7 studies), Africa (6) and Latin America (2). These evaluated interventions in the education sector (9 studies), health (3), infrastructure (2) and employment promotion (1).

What was found: Community monitoring interventions were found to be effective in reducing corruption. They appear to be more effective in improving outcomes when they promote direct contact between citizens and providers or politicians, and when they include tools for citizens to monitor the performance of providers and politicians.

Community monitoring interventions were not found to be effective on school enrolments or dropouts.

No improvement was found in health service waiting times.

There is a need for adequate information and tools to assist citizens with community monitoring.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the coronavirus (COVID-19) but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the coronavirus (COVID-19) on the basis of this summary alone.

Share