A long way to go: a systematic review to assess the utilisation of sexual and reproductive health services during humanitarian crises

Added August 27, 2020

Citation: Singh NS, Aryasinghe S, Smith J, et al. A long way to go: a systematic review to assess the utilisation of sexual and reproductive health services during humanitarian crises. BMJ Global Health 2018;3:e000682.

Despite increased attention to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service provision in humanitarian crises settings, the evidence base is still very limited.

Women and girls are affected significantly in both sudden and slow-onset emergencies and face multiple sexual and reproductive health (SRH) challenges in humanitarian crises contexts. There are an estimated 26 million women and girls of reproductive age living in humanitarian crises settings, all of whom need access to SRH information and services. This systematic review aimed to assess the utilisation of services of SRH interventions from the onset of emergencies in low- and middle-income countries. More research is needed to identify interventions and modalities of implementation for known SRH interventions to increase utilisation of SRH services in diverse humanitarian crises settings and crises-affected populations.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on humanitarian response but may not have the time, initially, to read the report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence presented within it is relevant to their decision-making, they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions.

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